Unlawful Dismissal Lawyer

The Fair Employment and Housing Act prohibits an employer from dismissing/discharging an employee based on his or her: sexual orientation, age, gender, race, color, physical or mental disability; medical condition; national origin, marital status, pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions, religious creed, or ancestry. Gov. C. § 12940(a). It is unlawful for an employer to dismiss an employee from employment because of any of the characteristics mentioned above. Gov. C. § 12940(a).

Unlawful Dismissal Due to Sex or Gender

It is unlawful for an employer to dismiss an employee from employment because of the employee’s sex or gender. Gov. C. § 12940(a). One of the common forms of discrimination by employers is to discriminate based on a gender stereotype. In other words, an employer may discriminate by saying that the employee failed to act like a man or woman.

For example, an employer may receive complaints from male regional managers about a female employee, who is a store manager. The regional managers complained to the employer that the female employee was too loud and aggressive towards customers and her co-workers at the store. They also made comments about her pants and her hair style. They mentioned that the clothes she wears and her hair style make her look like a man. The regional managers might have even said that she acts too much like a man and that she should act more like a woman. After hearing of these complaints, the owner of the company fires the woman employee and says that it is because she is not feminine enough. If you find yourself in a situation similar to this, contact the Los Angeles employee lawyers at our office.

Unlawful Dismissal Due to Age

It is unlawful for an employer to dismiss an employee from employment because of the employee’s age. Gov. C. § 12940(a). Under this section, age refers to individuals who are over 40 years old. Many times, employers dismiss employees solely because of their age, not because they lack the ability to perform their jobs. Employees are protected from this type of unlawful dismissal.

For example, a sales person has just turned 50 years old. The sales person has been working for the same employer for 8 years and he or she has always met the necessary quarterly sales goals. However, once the sales person turned 50, the employer decided to dismiss the sales person because he or she thought that the sales person was too old for the position. In addition, his younger co-workers who had similar jobs (sales jobs) retained their jobs. Two weeks after he or she was dismissed, the employer hired a 30 year old employee for that same position. If you find yourself in a situation similar to this, contact the Los Angeles employee lawyers at our office.

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If you have been unlawfully dismissed from your workplace, contact California's top wrongful termination attorneys at 323-857-5900.